Some of you many know I am working on a new course Manual Osteopathy 

Here is some of the new services I'll be offering in July!

What is Manual Osteopathy? 

Manual osteopaths identify, assess, and treat the body’s structures and rhythms using a gentle, hands-on approach. This fundamental technique is called osteopathic palpation. Manual osteopaths develop a very sensitive sense of touch to master osteopathic palpation. Osteopathic palpation is what makes manual osteopathy different from other forms of therapy.

Soft Tissue Manipulation

This is used it to evaluate the condition of tissues and to help the body’s fluids flow smoothly. Keeping fluids flowing smoothly reduces harmful fluid retention and makes the body’s immune system more effective. Fascia is tissue found in all parts of the body. It connects all of the body’s structures at both superficial and deep levels.

Osteopathic Articular Technique

This technique can be used to reduce muscle spasms near a joint, ease neurological irritations around a joint, make joints more mobile and to reduce pain and discomfort.  The articular technique involves gently moving 2 joint surfaces.  Many patients find this technique less forceful than joint manipulations.

Cranial Osteopathy

With training hands can become sensitive to the cranial mobility and develop great precision in utilizing cranial techniques. Manual osteopaths use this gentle technique to assess and treat the mobility of the skull and its contents. They may also use it to assess and treat the spine, the sacrum, and other parts of the body. The goal of this technique is to adjust the body’s physiology by restoring balance to the circulation of the blood and other body fluids.

Visceral Manipulation

Visceral manipulation is used to treat organs and viscera of the body, including the lungs, heart, liver, spleen, kidneys, stomach, pancreas, intestines, bladder and uterus. Patients may feel pain in one or more of these organs, or the viscera may be less pliable than it should be. Manual osteopaths gently move the structures themselves and the fascia (connective tissue) that surrounds them to restore full movement.